Search Results

« Previous Entries

Hepatitis A infection is caused by the hepatitis A virus (HAV).

When infected by hepatitis A virus, adolescents and adults are more inclined than young kids to develop indications of disease, including fever, weakness, nausea, abdominal pain, dark urine, and yellow eyes and skin, and are more likely to experience severe disease.

Symptoms usually last under two months, but 10% to 15% of these infected may have prolonged or relapsing disease lasting as much as six months. Unlike hepatitis B and C, chronic hepatitis A disease does not occur. Unfortunately, every year within the U.S. 125,000 to 200,000 people become sick with hepatitis A. In the united states, 70 to 100 people die? mostly those with underlying liver disease.

Most hepatitis A illness happens in community-wide outbreaks. Herpes virus is most often spread in stool, although it could be spread through connection with infected blood. Infection is transmitted from person to person in households and relatives settings. Outbreaks sometimes occur when many people have eaten from the same hepatitis A-infected meal source but nearly half of individuals have no identified risk factor. Infected people are probably to spread hepatitis A virus throughout the two-week period before they are fully aware they’re infected. Since most infected pre-school children show no the signs of hepatitis A infection, they frequently unknowingly distribute the hepatitis A virus to others.

Before the introduction of  hepatitis A, about one-third from the hepatitis A cases in the U.S. occurred in children 5 to 14 years old. The lowest rate of infection is at adults a lot more than 40 years old. The rates of infection and disease were much greater in some areas of the country than the others.

hepatitis a vaccine Hepatitis A Vaccine

hepatitis a vaccine side effects, hepatitis a vaccine price, hepatitis b vaccine, hepatitis c, typhoid vaccine, hepatitis c vaccine, hepatitis a vaccine brand name, hepatitis a vaccine ingredients

Hepatitis A virus (HAV) is an RNA virus of a single serotype. Infection usually causes clinical hepatitis in adults and school-aged children but is often asymptomatic in younger children. Jaundice develops in < 10% of children 6 years and under. Typical symptoms of illness include anorexia, nausea, fatigue, fever and jaundice. The severity of the illness increases with age. Recovery often takes 4 to 6 weeks but may take months. Recurrent hepatitis for up to a year occurs in about 15% of cases, but longer chronic infection is not known to occur. About 25% of reported adult cases require hospitalization. Fulminant disease with liver necrosis is rare but can be fatal. Individuals with pre-existing chronic liver disease are at increased risk of serious complications from HAV infection. The overall estimated case fatality rate associated with hepatitis A is 0.1% to 0.3%, but this rises to 1.8% in persons over the age of 50. It reaches 12.5% in patients over the age of 60 who are hospitalized due to the disease.

Since the publication of the 2002 Canadian Immunization Guide, new data happen to be obtained on the epidemiology of hepatitis A in Canada as well as on the immunization coverage of travellers to endemic countries.

Hepatitis A virus (HAV) is an RNA virus of merely one serotype. Infection usually causes clinical hepatitis in adults and school-aged children but is often asymptomatic in younger children. Jaundice develops in < 10Percent of kids 6 many under. Typical symptoms of illness include anorexia, nausea, fatigue, fever and jaundice. The seriousness of the illness increases with age. Recovery normally takes four to six weeks but might take months. Recurrent hepatitis for up to a year occurs in about 15% of cases, but longer chronic infection isn’t recognized to occur. About 25% of reported adult cases require hospitalization. Fulminant disease with liver necrosis is rare but can be fatal. Individuals with pre-existing chronic liver disease are at increased risk of serious complications from HAV infection. The entire estimated case fatality rate related to hepatitis A is 0.1% to 0.3%, but this rises to 1.8% in persons older than 50. It reaches 12.5% in patients over the age of 60 who’re hospitalized due to the disease.

Because the publication of the 2002 Canadian Immunization Guide, new data happen to be obtained on the epidemiology of hepatitis A in Canada as well as on the immunization coverage of travellers to endemic countries.

HAV is most often transmitted through the fecal-oral route, through direct contact with infected people or indirectly through ingestion of contaminated water or foods. On rare occasions, transmission continues to be reported after contact with HAV-contaminated blood or blood products. It also occurs through sexual activities that include direct or indirect oro-anal contact although not through exposure to saliva, semen or urine. The virus may persist for days or weeks in the environment. Shedding of the virus in feces and thus maximum infectiousness occurs throughout the latter part of the incubation period with peak levels within the 2 weeks before clinical illness. Infectiousness diminishes rapidly thereafter and ends shortly after the start of jaundice. Humans are the principal reservoir for HAV. Persistent infection does not occur. The incubation period ranges from 15 to 50 days with an average of 20 to 30 days. Lifelong immunity usually follows infection.

In Canada, between 1990 and 2004 the amount of cases of HAV infection reported annually varied from 3,562 (1991) to 396 (2003), representing rates of 10.8 and 1.2 per 100,000 population respectively. Throughout this era, there has been outbreaks involving men that have relations with men  in main Canadian cities. Because the introduction of the vaccine in 1996, no new major outbreak has occurred, and the incidence rate has slowly decreased. It is not known whether this really is due to the impact of the targeted immunization programs. There is no info on the proportion of targeted groups being immunized, but it’s likely low. The estimated coverage in MSM after the huge immunization campaign during the Montreal outbreak was only 35%. Within Canada, there have been considerable geographic variations within the reported incidence, and this is observed even during periods of decline nationally. In the 5 year period of 1999 to 2004, no substantial sex difference in reported rates was observed. In 2004, the reported rate was 1.4 among females and 1.6 among males per 100,000 population. Age-specific incidence was highest among those 15-24 years old with a rate of 2.3 per 100,000 population, followed closely by those aged 5-14.

Balantidiasis is an infection caused by infection with the protozoan Balantidium coli. Symptoms The symptoms may be due to local participation in the intestinal mucosa or systemic in nature and include diarrhea or constipation. Balantidiasis treatment can be treated with tetracycline, carbarsone, metronidazole, or diiodohydroxyquin. History and epidemiology The first study to generate balantidiasis in humans was carried out by Cassagrande and Barnagallo in 1896. However, this experiment has failed to establish an infection and it is unclear whether the parasite Balantidium coli is actually used. Balantidiasis The first case of the Philippines, where it is most common, reported in 1904. Today, Balantidium coli is distributed worldwide, but less than 1% of the population is infected. Pigs are an important reservoir of the parasite, and infection of humans is more common in areas where pigs comingle with people.

This includes places like the Philippines, as mentioned above, it also includes countries like Bolivia and Papua New Guinea. But pigs are not the only animal where the parasite. In a Japanese study.

balantidiasis What is Balantidiasis ?

balantidiasis treatment, balantidiasis symptoms, human balantidiasis, patients with balantidiasis, information balantidiasis, medical balantidiasis, balantidiasis definition, prevention balantidiasis

Balantidium coli in one of two stages: trophozoites and cysts. In the trophozoite form, they can be oblong or spherical, and are generally 30 to 150 microns in length and 25 to 120 micrometers wide. It is the size at this stage that allows Balantidium coli be characterized as the largest protozoan parasite of humans. Trophozoites have both a macronucleus and a micronucleus, and both are usually visible. The macronucleus is large, sausage-shaped, while the micronucleus is less important. At that time the agency is not contagious, but can reproduce by transverse fission.

The cyst stage, the parasite takes on a smaller, circular with a diameter of about 40-60 micrometers. Unlike trophozoite, whose surface is just a hair, a cyst form is a wall made difficult by one or more layers. Cyst differs from the vegetative form, because it is a non-mobile and will not be increased. Instead, the cyst is the form, when the parasite is causing the infection.

Diagnosis

Balantidiasis is an uncommon infection.  Symptoms, if present, include diarrhea, dysentery, and abdominal pain. Balantidiasis should be considered if the patient works closely with pigs or other livestock, lives in or has recently traveled to a region with poor water sanitation, or has had contact with infected persons.

Balantidiasis diagnosis can be a complex process, because the symptoms may or may not be made. However, the diagnosis Balantidiasis be considered for patients with diarrhea may have current exposure to amebiasis through travel, contact with infected people or rectum. In addition, the diagnosis can be made Balantidiasis microscopic stool or tissue samples.

Prevention

Effective preventive measures require the personal and community hygiene. Some specific safeguards include:

  • Purification of drinking water.
  • Proper handling of food.
  • Provision of accurate human feces.
  • Follow-up contacts balantidiasis patients.

Yersiniosis is a relatively rare infection came from the ingestion of insufficiently meat, unpasteurized milk or water contaminated by bacteria.

Normally, a person with an infection caused by a bacterium Yersinia recovers in a few days without medical treatment (in some cases, doctors prescribe antibiotics).

About Yersinia Enterocolitica

Of the three main types of yersiniosis affect people, Yersinia enterocolitica (bacteria thrive with cool temperatures) are responsible for most infections in the United States. However, there is only one confirmed case of 100,000 people every year.affects the digestive system.

The bacteria can infect the digestive system of humans, cats, dogs, pigs, cows and goats. People can contract by eating or handling contaminated food such as raw or undercooked meat or drinking untreated water or unpasteurized milk that was contaminated.

A baby can become infected if a parent or guardian is responsible for cleaning contaminated food without properly before handling the baby toys, bottles or pacifiers.

Signs and symptoms

Symptoms of yersiniosis appear 4 to 7 days after exposure and can last up to 3 weeks. They include fever, abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting and bloody diarrhea. Sometimes, older children also feel pain in the lower right side of the abdomen that can mimic appendicitis.

yersinia enterocolitica 300x199 Whats Yersinia Enterocolitica ?

yersinia enterocolitica pictures, yersinia enterocolitica morphology, yersinia enterocolitica symptoms, yersinia enterocolitica treatment, yersinia enterocolitica prevention, yersinia enterocolitica infection, yersinia pseudotuberculosis, yersinia enterocolitica diagnosis

If your child has these symptoms, contact your doctor. Children, it is especially important to call your doctor as soon as symptoms appear to prevent infection leads to other health problems.

In rare cases, infection can cause a rash or joint pain that appears a month after the first symptoms. But these symptoms disappear without treatment.

Treatment

Diarrhea caused by yersiniosis generally goes to the same, although in some cases, antibiotics are prescribed. In infants, however – especially those who are 3 months or less – can become a more serious condition called bacteremia, a blood infection. Infants who contract yersiniosis are usually treated in a hospital.

Depending on the severity of diarrhea, your doctor may change your child’s diet for 1-2 days and encourage the child to drink more fluids (which may include drinks with electrolytes to replace body fluids quickly.)

If your child has frequent episodes of diarrhea, look for signs of dehydration, including:

  • Severe thirst
  • Dry mouth or tongue
  • Sunken eyes
  • Dry skin
  • Rarely urination
  • In children, a dry diaper for several hours

Prevention

To reduce the risk of yersiniosis, take the following precautions:

  • Don’t eat raw meat or serve undercoooked.
  • Power and serving of milk products or milk.
  • Wash hands with soap and water, especially before eating and preparing food, before touching the children or their toys, bottles or pacifiers, and after contact with animals or handling raw meat.
  • Use separate cutting boards for meat and other foods.
  • Clean all cutting boards, counters, and utensils with soap and warm water after preparing raw meat.
  • Always cook meat before eating, especially pork products.
  • Removal of animal feces and wastewater something they have touched.
  • Avoid drinking directly from natural water sources such as ponds and mountain streams, especially if the water is near farmland where cattle, pigs, goats are raised.
  • When you care for a family member who has diarrhea, remember to wash hands thoroughly before touching other people and before handling food.
  • If your dog or cat has diarrhea, wash your hands every time you take care of him, and seek veterinary care and / or infectivity.

When to call the doctor

Call your doctor if your child:

  • A diarrhea traces of blood
  • There is a vomit
  • Shows signs of dehydration

With a little rest, usually children yersiniosis make a full recovery soon.

« Previous Entries